Reality TV: Too real for celebrities

Celebrities being duped by the lure of their own TV show have been licking their wounds this week after the launch of The Pilot Show on British television's E4 channel on Monday.

David Seaman in particular has been publicly outed for not wanting his embarrassing turn on E4's new show.

However, he need not feel alone in his shame as 20,000 of his fellow British males were also lured into the programme via advertisements, in national newspapers and on TV, for Lapdance Island.

The Pilot Show's mission is to "dupe unsuspecting celebrities and members of the public", into taking part in pilots for future television shows.
The program has already caught Dean Gaffney, fresh from the dismal ITV2 show "The Club", who is asked to sign on for "Soul Searching", where he will supposedly lead a team to find David Soul, of Starsky and Hutch fame, who is hiding somewhere.

Also captured on camera being totally oblivious or just plain naive is Alex Sibley from Big Brother 3, who is to front a new show called Coming out of the Closet, where he will surprise people by jumping out of their closets.

When he secretes himself away, ready to pounce, his victims come home and immediately set to undressing each other on the lounge floor. Leaving a highly embarrassed Sibley to exit, tail between his legs.

As mentioned before, Lapdance Island advertisements were the first sign that a new Reality TV show was on the horizon. It was this reporter's opinion that it couldn't be real… could it?

When the "apology" was flashed, all was revealed. It was indeed a joke, which caught those amongst the over-sexed male population, stupid or desperate enough for it, hook, line and sinker.

The message on the E4 website now includes the message: "OK, it was a cheap shot. If you applied we are sorry to say there are no lap dancers and there is no island."

A stunningly original idea when compared to the plethora of other shows out there, especially with the imminent return of The Salon, The Games and the never-ending stream of "I'm a Celebrity in need of re-invention" vehicles, it seems a welcome breath of fresh air.

For a change, this program shows up those fame hungry celebrities who are still craving the limelight, especially when some have already occupied far too much of it.

However, it also speaks volumes about all those hot-blooded males who fell for Lapdance Island. Who knows what they were thinking?

Carol Sarler, in the Daily Express on Wednesday, seemed to believe that it was a gross injustice on David Seaman to have to endure such torment, especially when he expressed his feelings about the broadcast. That somehow he was forced into making a fool of himself. Except he agreed to take part without first asking some key questions, such as "What will this do to my credibility?" Or "Is this really legit?

Carol Sarler also seems to think that it is okay for celebrities to take part in these programs, as long as no one is trying to make fun of them and that they know what they are getting into. I must apologise Miss Sadler, but where's the point in that?

It is about time we stopped worshipping at the altar of the celebrity and grew up, but I might be the only one here not nose deep in Heat every week.

After all, they are adults and do you really expect us to feel sorry for a moment's embarrassment on their part? Would they do the same for you?

Perhaps television producers should stop encouraging these hapless, hopeless, fame-seeking members of the public.

It is becoming tiresome seeing them debase themselves for the price of being noticed and trying to become one of the celebrities who also fell prey to the show.

That, and of course, the money.

If however, you still enjoy this kind of ritual humiliation then "The Pilot Show" continues every Monday at 2230 BST on E4.